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Gas welding is also known as Oxy-fuel welding or oxyacetylene welding used for cutting arc processes with the help of gases and oxygen to weld as well as to cut metals. This technology uses air (combination of 20% oxygen and 80% nitrogen) to increase the flame temperature that enables to find focused melting of the workpiece material of the metals in a room environment. The welding tools used in gas welding give more precise and faster weld to several kinds of metals.

Small, high-flow, oxygen flames provide enough heat flow to exceed the melting point in a large metal sheet. A common propane flame burns at about 2,000 degree Celsius, an oxygen flame burns at about 2,500 degree Celsius, and an acetylene/oxygen flame burns at about 3,500 degree Celsius. The iron melts at about 1,500 degree Celsius so the air flames can meet melting only in a specialized manner. Gas welding is one of the oldest welding processes and in the recent year, it has found enough popularity in many industrial applications.

Under the gas welding process two pieces are heated to a high temperature that can produce a shared pool of the molten metal. Generally, this molten pool is supplied with additional metal called filler that depends upon the nature of metals to be welded. In this gas welding process a cutting torch is used to heat metal to kindling temperature. The process uses welding tools to create steam of oxygen to burn metal.

Those torches that do not mix fuel with oxygen are not considered as gas welding torches, and they typically identified as a single tank. Such types of single torches are used only for the soldering and brazing rather than welding purposes. Gas welding tools are still in much demand because of their inexpensive and portable characters, and many times, they are used when TIG welding is not available to execute welding process.
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